THROWBACK FILES: Rapper Logic Speaks…Well, A Little Logic

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His tracks aren’t yet quite chart-toppers. You don’t hear his name as often as you should. But lyricist and rapper Logic has earned a great deal of respect in the hip hop game. Not only that, but the album he released in 2015 did quite solid numbers for someone who isn’t shoved down our throats by the media every five seconds.

Maybe Logic (a.k.a. Robert Bryson Hall) has earned this respect because of his rhymes. Maybe he’s earned this level of respect because of the broad range of intellect that he displays. Not only does he write rhymes and deliver them in a distinctive way, but he also solves Rubik’s cubes onstage in the middle of his performances. Or maybe it’s the fact that he’s displayed the capability of pushing more physical albums than a lot of the artists who are shoved down our throats these days.

Whatever the reason, when Logic speaks, the people listen. He has always shown candor when speaking on today’s biggest names in hip hop. With all of the hate and negativity that gets thrown around in the hip hop industry, and with several rap artists getting a bit… shall we say, extra in terms of their commentary on other artists…it’s extremely refreshing to hear a voice of reason. That is why we are throwing back to this 2015 interview where Logic explains to Genius his viewpoint on Drake and Tupac not being that different:

The hip hop industry has always been critical of every artist that dares to step into ring; in some ways, that isn’t a bad thing. But at times hip hop gets overly critical: judging a rapper too harshly just because he or she is missing a little melanin, judging the background a rapper comes from. God forbid you aren’t hood enough or street enough. When rap wasn’t always about gangbanging. In the early years of rap, we heard DJ’s rapping about their love for the music, how much they loved seeing a crowd dance to their beats. When did it become a prerequisite to have a certain amount of bullet holes punctured through your body?

Look…there will always be an appreciation for street rap. There will always be a sense of enjoyment from seeing a perceived underdog make it and preach to other young men who came from similar upbringings. It always moves me to see the faces of the young men who look up to these street rap stars, to see hope shining in their eyes. That is a powerful thing, and something that I never want to see disappear.

However, just because street rap does inspire a rather large number of people, we should never give the impression that one must come from the streets in order to live and breathe. If they can write a rhyme and deliver that flow, then that artist deserves your respect. You’ll be tempted to enter a joke here, but rest assured, Drake does, in fact, write his rhymes.

This article and Logic’s statements in the above video transcend the two artists he’s comparing, though. It’s not just about Drake, and it’s not just about Tupac. Any artist who has done the work, and lived and breathed hip hop for as long as he can remember, deserves a fair chance. Because even though someone comes from a more privileged upbringing than yours, that doesn’t mean that he or she hasn’t lived through experiences that you can relate to. Stop limiting your own sources of entertainment. Stop being so close-minded. And stop underestimating your own ability to relate to someone else’s non-street struggle.

Those who live and breathe hip hop know who Logic is and have heard at least one of his songs. But for those who haven’t, I’ll drop this here:

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